Letters at the End of Your Name

It takes a special kind of idiot to go from point A to point B in a tank-top, short shorts, and gloves.

That’s right. In high school (the prep school half of it), I was on the cross-country team.

Why was I on said team, you might ask? (I’m so glad you might asked!)

On campus, of lush green grass & trees in the bustling metropolis barely-more-than-a-post-office town of Byfield, I would be seen jogging to class, as a result of leaving to said class at the last responsible moment. It never occurred to me that this was an abnormal ambulatory mode until someone mentioned, on my way, in my way, to said class, that I should join said team.

One year, one of the perks of said team was the track jacket.

That year, one of the perks of said jacket was the last name stitched onto the right sleeve.

That year, one of the perks of said sleeve was that mine said, “Lamont III”.

Now, thinking back, I must’ve been the only kid with a name with a suffix, so growing up “Merrill B. Lamont III” was something I at some point embraced. Where I could get away with it, I’d employ said suffix with said middle initial. I was never, “Merrill B. Lamont”, or “Merrill Lamont III”, if I could help it; it was either “Merrill Lamont”, or “Merrill B. Lamont III”. Those were the sanctioned brands. Go big or go mortal.

So when I finished college, and had the option of adding “B.S.” at the end of my name, I didn’t, ’cause I already had letters, thank you very much. (Plus, nobody really does that.)

And when I finished grad school, and had the option of adding “M.Eng.” at the end of my name, I didn’t. (Now we’re getting into territory where people do that.)

And when I got my Scrum certifications, and had the options of adding “CSM” and “CSPO” at the end of my name, I didn’t. (Now we’re getting into LinkedIn territory where people do that.)

I recently got my “Scrum@Scale Practitioner” certificate, and while there is no set of letters in domain-specific & common enough usage, I gave myself the option of adding “CS@S” at the end of my name, which I did. Once. (This was just to let HR know I took the course & passed the test they paid for. And then I immediately regretted said nominal appendage. I let them know that, too. In the same email, I also told them I would never use that as a suffix again. Maybe I tell HR too much.)

Interested in a friendly framework for applying Scrum to your whole organization, or at least multiple delivery teams?

There’s a free guide online.

There’s also me.

The special kind of idiot with enough letters at the end of said name.