You Have Good Taste

I ran across a quote from Ira Glass while reading Signal vs. Noise, the blog by the guys at 37signals (two of the guys from that crew wrote Rework). Of course, the quote was in posterized form – I’m guessing this guy was inspired. Enjoy.

Ira Glass Quote

Just in case you can’t get the above pic, I’ve written it out for ya. Enjoy. Again.

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners – I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.

Top of Your Todo List

Paul Graham is an expert in the Lisp programming language, co-founder of the tech incubator Y Combinator, and writes at paulgraham.com on entrepreneurship, hackers, and, in his last post, life: The Top of My Todo List.

It’s short and intersects with the spirit of my last three blog posts. Here is the punch line:

Don’t ignore your dreams; don’t work too much; say what you think; cultivate friendships; be happy.

I have heard that one of the big goals of life is essentially to die well: to lie on your death bed and know you’ve given your greatest gift. Paul sums this up: don’t be a cog. I like how Chris Guillebeau phrases it in ‘The $100 Startup’, which is actually from Steve Jobs: Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.

Read Paul’s essay here.